Are AMP Pages Worth the Hassle? The Good, Bad and Unexpected

I have been running AMP pages on several of my websites for more than 12 months.

Overall I have to say that I would recommend using AMP pages on a WordPress site.

I have had a few issues though so from my experience here is the good and the bad:

My AMP setup

I have used AMP on WordPress and there are two plugins that I have used for this.

The AMP plugin by Automattic

AMP for WP – Accelerated Mobile Pages

If you are wanting to run Adsense on your AMP pages I found that the AMP for WP plugin was the way to go.

Image: Source

Good things about AMP pages

Bad things about AMP pages

  • Sometimes doesn’t accurately convert from the html/css from your site
  • Hard to put adverts on
  • Potentially multiple versions of site to be edited

Unexpected Learnings about AMP Pages

One of the cool things about having your pages in the AMP cache is that even if your website server has a problem, or crashes altogether your cached AMP pages will still be available via Google search.

The downside of this is when you make an update to a page it may take some time before it updates the cache. There are ways that you can force the cache to update sooner.

Another unexpected problem that I had was at one time an update of the AMP plugin I was using broke my entire website.

This is not really an issue with AMP though, more of a plugin problem.

I generally have my plugins set to update automatically, and although this saves a lot of time, in the long run, it runs a bigger risk of a plugin update causing an issue.

Final Thoughts on AMP Pages

If you want to give your rankings a quick boost and provide a better mobile experience for your website visitors setting up AMP pages is a great way to go.

If you have had any good/bad experiences with AMP pages, please share them with us.

Rob StGeorge
Senior SQL Server Database Administrator residing in Auckland, NZ

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